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De Havilland Mosquito balsa wood

de Havilland Mosquito Bomber, Easy Built Models #D01 Balsa

Wood from around the globe made the de Havilland Mosquito

The decorated WWII vet who flew dozens of deadly missions in a balsa wood plane. Thomas Horton flew three generations of the World War II wooden aircraft, formally titled a de Havilland DH.98, but. The use of a plywood and balsa sandwich for the Mosquito fuselage by de Havilland was not entirely new, but in war time Britain it took on special significance. Wood was in plentiful supply, and its use meant the design stages could be speeded up, prototypes more quickly produced, an appropriate workforce was available, repair work could be.

The de Havilland Mosquito was also called the 'Wooden Wonder'. Sir Geoffrey de Havilland decided to build his aircraft out of wood. This was a controversial decision as almost all combat aircraft at the time had a metal structure. Although it is often believed that this was to preserve precious metals and would create an aircraft which. The de Havilland DH.98 Mosquito is a British twin-engined, shoulder-winged multirole combat aircraft, introduced during the Second World War.Unusual in that its frame was constructed mostly of wood, it was nicknamed the Wooden Wonder, or Mossie. Lord Beaverbrook, Minister of Aircraft Production, nicknamed it Freeman's Folly, alluding to Air Chief Marshal Sir Wilfrid Freeman, who defended. The Mosquito first flew in 1940 and was notable for it wood construction. The Mosquito had many variants being used as a unarmed bomber, fighter, night fighter, reconnaissance ground attack and anti-shipping. The model has a 53″ (134m) wing span, prototypes weighing in at around 65ozs all up. It requires 2 x 480 motors with [

Balsa wood has been used in construction since the second world war. During the war, balsa was one of the timbers used in building the de Havilland Mosquito aircraft. Balsa wood being lighter. It is used in boat construction to reduce the weight of the boat. Today, balsa Wood is used in plywood by using Modern Technology de Havilland Mosquito Bomber, Easy Built Models #D01 Balsa Wood Model Airplane Kit de Havilland Mosquito Bomber is a 1/20 scale display model that uses the Box and Former method of building. Includes a formed canopy and markings. This kit was first released during WWII. Pre-1942 design, eligible for Society of Antique Modelers contests

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Includes a 10:1 winder, moldable nose weight, FAI SuperSport rubber 32 feet each 3/32, 1/8, and 3/16 and 32 feet EBM 1/16 rubber. Save 23% off individually priced items! item B331 Price: $34.95. Customer photos: Submit a photo of your model! Nobuchika Okada converted his Mosquito for rubber powered flight. Read his building notes DH98 Mosquito PR.XVI (81″) £ 12.50 - £ 485.00. Designed by Brian Taylor, this beautiful 1/8th scale, 2.057m (81) wingspan model is a major but very rewarding project. The three sheet plan builds into a PR.XVI photo reconnaissance aircraft and details of the location of the camera ports are shown on the plan, as are details of how to.

By Michael D. Hull. Of the many highly successful fighter planes and bombers in the Allied arsenal during World War II, none was more versatile or singular than the Royal Air Force's de Havilland Mosquito. Constructed of spruce, birch, balsa, and plywood, the twin-engine, two-seater Wooden Wonder played a unique role in 1941-1945 as a. Yes, some of it. Ash had long been used in frames - I once had a 1947 MG TC, which had an ash frame*. Thanks for the A2A, Robert DuHamel. They also used a Monsanto adhesive, patented by my sister's father-in-law, to glue it together. OQ: Did the U.. DAYTON, Ohio - De Havilland DH 98 cockpit at the National Museum of the U.S. Air Force. (U.S. Air Force photo) The famous British Mosquito - known to many as Mossie - was a versatile aircraft used extensively during World War II. Constructed primarily of plywood with a balsa wood core, it had excellent speed, altitude and range The Mosquito's unique wood construction allowed parts to be made in Furniture Factories across Britain & Canada. To construct the Fuselage, 10mm sheets of Ecuadorean Balsa wood sandwiched between sheets of Canadian Birch was formed inside large Concrete Moulds. Each Mould held half of the Fuselage and once dry, the Control Lines & Wires were. The Mosquito was arguably the RAF's most useful and successful aeroplane. It needed a plane which could strike deep into enemy territory, fulfil multiple roles and was really fast. De Havilland's dual-engined concept involved extensive use of wood..

de Havilland Mosquito B Mk

De Havilland's idea was simple - to power the plane with two Rolls Royce Merlin engines so that its sole defence, other than the skill of the pilot, was sheer speed to keep it out of harms way. The structure of the Mosquito was to be entirely made out of wood with a stressed skin of thin laminated plywood over a balsa core De Havilland Mosquito Manual: An insight into developing, flying, including balsa! The wood was molded into the curved shapes and bonded together. It became known as the Wooden Wonder and the crew The Mosquito had a frame of wood and a skin of plywood, and it was glued and screwed together in England, Canada, and Australia.. The National Air and Space Museum Mosquito, Royal Air Force (RAF) serial number TH 998, was built by the main de Havilland factory at Hatfield as a B. Mk. 35 bomber version in 1945 under Contract number 555/C.23 (a). It was part of a batch numbered TH 977-999

YellowAirplane.com: De Havilland Mosquito World War 2 ..

  1. This auction is for a vintage Cleveland #SF-145 De Havilland Mosquito static display or rubber free flight balsa model airplane kit. This is the master kit and includes jars of paint which are probably no good because of age. 40 3/4 inch wing. Includes PRINTED balsa and ply, balsa wheels, covering, wood wheels, jars of paint and dope (no good.
  2. The de Havilland DH.103 Hornet, developed by de Havilland, was a fighter aircraft driven by two piston engines.It further exploited the wooden construction techniques that had been pioneered by the de Havilland Mosquito.Development of the Hornet had started during the Second World War as a private venture. The aircraft was to conduct long range fighter operations in the Pacific Theatre against.
  3. De Havilland Mosquito: 1940 onwards (all marks) - An insight into developing, flying, servicing and restoring Britain's legendary 'Wooden Wonder' fighter-bomber (Owners' Workshop Manual) DE Havilland Mosquito M.Div., NO. 627 Squadron, Royal Air Force, Wood hall Spa, England, June 1944 and DE Havilland Mosquito M.Div., No. 105 Squadron.
  4. Free Shipping Available. Buy on eBay. Money Back Guarantee
  5. ated wood as a material. With balsa wood and plywood in the fuselage and wings the factory created a light weight, high speed aircraft at a time when there was a shortage of alu
  6. The book Encyclopedia of Wood lists balsa as one of the woods used to build the de Havilland Mosquito aircraft. Other woods used to make the planes included ash, spruce and birch

Balsa has been the standard material for model aircraft for decades. Plastic foam materials offer better crash-resistance, but balsa is still used as a laminate core material in many high performance designs. The de Havilland Mosquito was built with balsa-cored plywood and proved to be one of the most vital combat aircraft of the Second World War The Mosquito inspired a German imitation, the Focke Wulf Ta 154 Moskito, which, like its namesake, was constructed of wood. It was also used as the basis for a single seater heavy fighter the de Havilland Hornet Design and development The de Havilland company conceived the idea of a wooden aircraft to take advantage of th de Havilland Mosquito Bomber, Easy Built Models #D01 Balsa Wood Model Airplane Kit $37.99 Lockheed Hudson Bomber , Easy Built Models #D02 Balsa Wood Model Airplane Ki There are several uses of balsa wood, such as: Aircraft: Balsa wood shot to fame when it was used to construct British de Havilland Mosquito combat planes during World War II. It can be very successfully used to make light and stiff structures as model bridge tests and to make light wooden aircraft

Quote from the History of the DH Mosquito The Americans did not pursue their interest. It was thought the Lockheed P-38 Lightning could handle the same duties just as easily. @PV Pilot wrote:At that time with the true balsa wood constructionit's power to weight ratio was unmatched for a bit. The brits especially liked it for skip-bombing. But his balsa wood drone announcement seems to be more about signaling cooperation, however meager, on an area that is central to our expansive goals than necessarily making us fear his balsa wood toy itself. The WW II De Havilland Mosquito, with twin Rolls Royce Merlin Engines had a top speed of over 400 MPH and a ceiling of over. The Mosquito as a light bomber had few peers in its service life and having a two man crew and internal space meant it could do a lot more much more easily. Almost comically when de Havilland produced a top class single seat fighter (the Hornet) they were then asked to put another man in it After the war, de Havilland's own company came up with the Albatross, a plane made of balsa and plywood, kind of like a model aeroplane, only massive and brilliant. The design principles of the Albatross were later adopted for the creation of the Mosquito, with Geoffrey de Havilland cleverly realising that supplies of metal would run low.

We will source our supply of Canadian Spruce from the same forest area that was used by de Havilland Canada to build their Mosquitoes during WW2. It is of the highest quality available. Other woods used will include birch, Ecuadorian balsa and ash. RL249's UK base. The People's Mosquito will house, maintain and display the aircraft in Britain As it is low-density but high in strength, balsa is a very popular material to use when making light, stiff structures in model bridge tests, model buildings, and for the construction of model aircraft — especially free flight model aircraft, as well as full-sized light wooden aeroplanes, most famously the World War II de Havilland Mosquito.[5

The structure of the Mosquito was to be entirely made out of wood with a stressed skin of thin laminated plywood over a balsa core. On 5 October 1939, with the Second World War a month old, the nucleus of a design team under the leadership of Eric Bishop, de Havilland's chief designer, moved to the security and secrecy of Salisbury Hall and. 1 32 De Havilland Mosquito Fb Mk Vi. Tamiya 1 72 De Havilland Mosquito B Mk Iv Pr Model Kit 60753 18 99. De Havilland Mosquito B Mk Iv 1 16 Balsa Kit Historic Aviation. Tamiya Tam61062 0 0208 De Havilland Mosquito Fb Mk 6 Airplane Kit Canada. Airfix De Havilland Mosquito Large Scale Planes The de Havilland Aircraft Museum has received £41,000 from the Heritage Lottery Fund (HLF) to complete the restoration of the de Havilland Mosquito Prototype fighter-bomber. Aircraft Overview: The fast, high-flying Mosquito was for much of the War able to roam almost at will over enemy-occupied territory In the United Kingdom, the De Havilland Aircraft Company (founded by Geoffrey de Havilland, a cousin of Olivia de Havilland, the actress who dated Howard Hughes in 1938) used similar composite construction for aircraft including the DH.88 Comet, DH.91 Albatross, the Mosquito, and Vampire. The aeromold process differs in that it is baked at a. The Mosquito outlived its supposed successor, the wood-and-aluminum de Havilland Hornet, by several months of RAF service. A new, larger, Merlin-powered Mosquito Series 2 airframe had been planned but never built, and the conceptualized Super Mosquito suffered the same fate

Like the Comet and Albatross mainplanes, de Havilland constructed Mosquito mainplanes out of shaped pieces of wood and plywood cemented together with Casein glue. Approximately 30,000 small, brass wood screws also reinforced the glue joints inside a Mosquito mainplane (another 20,000 or so screws reinforced glue joints in the fuselage and. Prior to 1939, the De Havilland Aircraft Company in the UK had established its expertise in the field of wooden aircraft construction. A particular example was the 1936 DH91 Albatross, which was a streamlined, four engine airliner, built almost entirely of wood. Its 'sandwich' fuselage construction consisted of balsa between two layers of plywood

Horton flew three generations of the World War II wooden aircraft, formally titled a de Havilland DH.98, but nicknamed the Mosquito, in 111 missions over Germany De Havilland DH-98 Mosquito model kit - MARK I Models. Shipped within 5-7 business days. £39.99. (VAT incl.) Model kit de Havilland Mosquito B.IV 'Wooden Bomber' (RAF) The de Havilland DH.98 Mosquito was a British multi-role combat aircraft develo. remove The de Havilland wood technique was slightly modified for the Mosquito as the aircraft would have to be reinforced for the abuses of military combat. Development eventually went beyond the original bomber prototype (FB) and included a specialized photographic reconnaissance (PR) version as well as a dedicated night fighter (NF) variant along. De Havilland Mosquito. The spruce-and-balsa wooden Mosquito multi-role aircraft were designed as fast light bombers that could outrun pursuing hostile fighters; because of their light weight and high speed, they were also used as fighters when necessary. Although the original design was released in 1938, it was not until 1940 when the British. As it is low-density but high in strength, balsa is a very popular material to use when making light, stiff structures in model bridge tests, model tree houses, and for the construction of model aircraft, as well as full-sized light wooden aeroplanes, most famously the World War II de Havilland Mosquito. Balsa is used to make wooden crankbaits.

The plan calls for the spars to be 3/32 balsa. Nah, not strong enough for my taste so composite spars were constructed. 1/64 ply skins were bonded to a 1/16 balsa core with wood glue. Once the center sections were made up the wing panels were built using the usual Guillows method. Next up, the motor mounts Balsa wood is a recently popularised wood compared to older European timbers, coming to prominence in World War II when it was used as part of the construction of aeroplanes like the de Havilland Mosquito (pictured right). In 1947, Norwegian explorer and writer Thor Heyerdahl set off on a raft made of this particular wood to cross the Pacific.

De Havilland proceeded to demonstrate. World Goes Haywire WITHOUT even diving for extra speed, as in slower planes, he simply eased back on the wheel . . . The nose came up sharply and the world seemed to be clinging to our tail; then the Mosquito arched over onto its back and, momentarily, there we were in the weirdest of attitudes Did a tour of the store and found, a balsa rack! Prices were at the pre-stupid level too. Only problem, I wasn't the first to discover it. Did manage to snag the last 2 sheets of 1/32 that is decent 6-8lb wood. Worked on the cockpit last night. Cut a balsa instrument panel and glued it in then applied the panel decal de Havilland Mosquito. Designed and planned as a private venture by the de Havilland company in the autumn of 1938, the de Havilland D.H.98 Mosquito was intended for use as an unarmed bomber or reconnaissance aircraft, one that would fly so fast and high that defensive armament would be superfluous An example of engineering ingenuity inspired by the challenges of war, the De Havilland Mosquito's all-wooden design was a major advantage during a time of acute shortages of light metal alloys. Most of the aircraft was made of plywood. The fuselage was a frameless shell made of balsa wood sandwiched between sheets of birch. Related Article The Seagull de Havilland Mosquito comes in a rather large box with full-color printed labels on four sides. The labels provide specifications and required items, as well as some nice photos of the airplane. Inside, I found the contents well packed, with all parts bagged and taped to prevent excess shifting during shipping

Horton flew three generations of the World War II wooden

The Mosquito Bomber Modular Airplane Morfus Modular

Discovery of lost WW2 Mosquito plans will allow 'Wooden Wonder' to fly again. A Second World War De Havilland Mosquito restored at Ardmore Airfield in Auckland, New Zealand for owner Gerald Yagen. The DH88 Comet first flew in 1934 and it was designed to compete in the England Australia Air Race. G-ACSS named Grosvenor House won and has been restored to its original colours by the shuttleworth collection. Another Comet Black Magic which also competed in the race is also being restored. The remaining 3 of the [ The Wooden Wonder makes an appearance in highly impressive 1/32 scale! That was the nickname given to the De Havilland Mosquito series of aircraft, an ingenious and beautiful design which saw the versatile airplane made almost entirely of wood. By the late 1930s, when design work on the Mosquito started, metal was the overwhelmingly favored. Mosquito, in full De Havilland DH-98 Mosquito, British twin-engine, two-seat, mid-wing bomber aircraft that was adapted to become the prime night fighter of the Allies during World War II. The Mosquito had a frame of wood and a skin of plywood, and it was glued and screwed together in England, Canada, and Australia When World War II broke out, the small company began to grow. Morris Motors used Aerolite and Aero Research's strip heating process to assemble Airspeed Horsa gliders, as did de Havilland on its Mosquito, as well as on other aircraft and also naval launches and patrol boats. On the Mosquito, Aerolite soon replaced the original Beetle Cement (known as Kaurit in Germany) synthetic resin.

The RAF's 'Wooden Wonder' RAF Museu

The Mosquito was designed to be built in wood at a time when combat aircraft were designed and wood sandwich of ply / balsa / ply with local spruce reinforcement and stiffening at points where early development of the prototype de Havilland 98 Mosquito. (The prototype can still be seen at it The de Havilland Mosquito was constructed primarily of plywood with a balsa wood core and had an excellent speed, altitude and range. The D.H.98 was based on the all-wood D.H. 91 Albatross, and the all-metal D.H. 95 Flamingo transports Aeromodellers, however, spent the entire war bemoaning the scarcity of balsa wood. Completed Mosquitos were turned out in Britain by de Havilland at Hatfield, Leavesden and Hawarden, the Standard Motor Company at Coventry, Percival Aircraft at Luton, and Airspee Aircraft at Portsmouth Making an aircraft mostly of wood, plywood, balsa and glue might seem obsolete even for 1938, especially for a high performance aircraft, but in fact the De Havilland Mosquito was the third in a family of excellent aircraft built from those materials by the De Havilland company, using highly advanced construction methods which resemble those. A n example of engineering ingenuity inspired by the challenges of war, the De Havilland Mosquito's all-wooden design was a major advantage during a time of acute shortages of light metal alloys. Most of the aircraft was made of plywood. The fuselage was a frameless shell made of balsa wood sandwiched between sheets of birch

BALSA WOOD CORE SANDWICH COMPOSITES: EXPERIMENTAL, ANALYTICAL AND FINITE ELEMENT APPROACHES A Thesis Submitted to the Faculty of the University of New Orleans in partial fulfillment of the Figure7: De Havilland Mosquito, the first mass produced (1940-1950) sandwich structur Yes, that wood: The lighter-than-air material you buy in pre-punched sheets to assemble your kids' toy gliders, the wood that sinks to the thickness of a saltine when you step on it. Horton flew three generations of the World War II wooden aircraft, formally titled a de Havilland DH.98, but nicknamed the Mosquito, in 111 missions over Germany

de Havilland Mosquito - Wikipedi

The Military Aviation Museum's de Havilland DH.98 Mosquito takes off. | AirshowStuffVideos / YouTube. The de Havilland DH.98 in the video belongs to Military Aviation Museum in Virginia Beach, VA. Watch this beautiful wooden wonder take off and land in all its effortless glory. Stick around until the end of the video to check out the start-up de Havilland Mosquito at Oost Malle (Belgium) Air Show in August 1993. Photo courtesy Marcel van Leeuwen. History: The all-wood Mosquito bomber was designed with war in mind. Powered by two Rolls-Royce Merlin engines, the Mosquito was as fast as a fighter and could carry the payload of a medium bomber The fuselage was constructed of a wood sandwich with a balsa core and plywood sheathing. The engine installation was particularly clean, with elegant slender cowlings and circular ram-air inlets in the leading edge of the wing on each side of each engine to provide cooling air for the engine radiators. DE HAVILLAND DH.91 ALBATROSS. At the advent of World War II, modern airplanes were metal while the all-wood structure of the Mosquito was proposed by the de Havilland Aircraft Company to offset Britain's metal.

DE Havilland DH98 Mosquito Kit - The Balsa Cabi

THE DE HAVILLAND 98 Mosquito was one of the most versatile aircraft of World War II. No other aircraft served so many roles as a day and night fighter, bomber, torpedo bomber, trainer, transport of high-value cargo, photo-reconnaissance craft and target tug. No other aircraft helped define quisling as wartime parlance for traitor. No othe The de Havilland design and production staff made many contributions that were, apparently, outside their field of expertise. In October 1941, C.T. Wilkins, suggested that if the normal 500lb (227kg) British bombs were fitted with shorter or retractable fins then the Mosquito could carry four of them in the bomb bay Geoffrey de Havilland knew there would be a shortage of aluminium during wartime and so made the Mosquito from a plywood and balsa wood composite. It was a fantastic piece of engineering by someone who was a pioneer and innovator

The Mosquito Bomber Modular Airplane | Morfus ModularDeHavilland Mosquitos, (RAF): | Wwii airplane, Vintage

Guillow Balsa Wood Aircraft Models . Wonderland Models have the widest range of Guillows balsa aircraft. Our Guillows range consists of all kinds including Guillows balsa aircraft and much more. We offer a wide range from all leading balsa wood models including the Guillows Wright Flyer, Lockheed P38L Lightning, B-17G Flying Fortress, Supermarine Spitfire and many more This plan is 1.9 MB and was shared by our member hlsat on 20/09/2015 10:19 in the PDF Bitmap Wood Plans from American Companies category. It has been downloaded 609 times by fellow modelers from around the world The de Havilland Mosquito was designed to be the fastest and most aerodynamic plane in the world. And it was built of wood. Geoffrey de Havilland (1882-1965) was the son of a Church of England vicar who built his first aircraft in 1909

Balsa Wood Properties, Uses and Advantages - Timber Blogge

We proudly present the de Havilland DH.98 Mosquito FB Mk VI for FSX and P3D. This highly detailed model features a fully functioning virtual cockpit, six authentic colour schemes and numerous animations including removable exhaust and engine covers, nose gun panels, belly gun panels and door, and bomb bay doors. Exterior model The prototype of the de Havilland DH.98 Mosquito unarmed light bomber was flown for the first time from Hatfield Aerodrome, Hertfordshire, England, United Kingdom. The aircraft was flown by Geoffrey de Havilland, accompanied by engineer John E. Walker. 2 Jun 1941 The British RAF took delivery of the first Mosquito PR 1 photo-reconnaissance. The De Havilland Mosquito was one of the most successful combat aircraft of the Second World War. Originally designed as a bomber fast enough to outpace enemy fighters, it was also used as a fighter and night fighter. Nearly 8000 were built. A De Havilland Mosquito The Mosquito was unusual in that it was built largely of wood. This was for.

de Havilland DH

De Havilland Mosquito: An Illistrated History By Ian Thirsk. Actually the average density of Balsa wood is 170 kg/m3 which is far less than Aluminium at 2700 kg/m3. Even when you take into account that Balsa is far weaker than Aluminium, The strength to weight ratio of Balsa is about 40% better. So an Aluminium Mosquito would have been. DROME De HAVILLAND MOSQUITO. Aircraft Model Kit 1945-1948 (made) Not currently on display at the V&A. Place Of Origin: England (made) 1. box lid, coarse heavy card, stapled at the ends. On the top is pasted a paper label, printed in orange and black on white to show the title , an illustration of the plane, details about the maker and contents. Horton flew three generations of the World War II wooden aircraft, the de Havilland Mosquito, in 111 missions over Germany. Nearly 80 years, his native country bestowed its service medal on him Inspired by the British wooden bomber aeroplane, the De Havilland DH 98 Mosquito, the '1.3 Chair' is constructed from compressed balsa wood, lime wood and hardwood veneer to give structural stability. Weighing only 1.28 kilograms, the chair is lighter than Gio Ponti's 1957 'Superleggera' chair

De Havilland Mosquito. 1 May 1944: Bombing - Berliners 'prepared to see it through' Armourers prepare to load 500-lb MC bombs into De Havilland Mosquito B Mark IV, DZ483 'GB-R', of No. 105 Squadron RAF at Marham, Norfolk, in preparation for a night raid on Berlin, Germany by aircraft of No. 2 Group de Havilland DH.98 Mosquito T.III, TV959 (FB Mk. VI). This particular aircraft was one of 358 T.III dual-control, unarmed trainer Mosquitos built, being constructed in August 1945 at the de Havilland Aircraft Company factory in Leavesden, England. Built too late to see combat in World War II, this particular aircraft flew as a trainer wit De Havilland Mosquito. The De Havilland Mosquito, a British military aircraft flown during World War II, is one of the most well-known aircraft of the war. When it entered service, its lightweight wooden construction and powerful engine helped it outpace the best of German fighter aircraft. The Mosquito was used in a wide range of roles. These are sections from the wing fuel tank access panel of a de Havilland Mosquito. This is from the Walter Lawrence factory at Sawbridgeworth. At the end of WW2 panels were removed from the factory and ended up as wall panels in a local barn. The structure is a ply and balsa wood sandwich. The brown edged holes are for the fuel tank straps

Pin on Air Forcede Havilland DH-98 Mosquito Airplane Desktop Wood ModelDe Havilland DH 98 Mosquito > National Museum of theOz : De Havilland Mosquito MK-IV plan - free downloadMosquito: Did It Have the Biggest Impact on WW2? | Flite Test

Constructed primarily of plywood with a balsa wood core, it had excellent speed, altitude and range. First flown on Nov. 25, 1940, the Mosquito entered production in mid-1941 and was produced until well after the end of the war. Almost 8,000 Mossies were built in Great Britain, Canada and Australia De Havilland Mk IV Mosquito. Plan 744. Type Model RC Scale Military. Wingspan 67in.Midwing. Engine Glow 2 x K&B .40 Control 5 channels. Designer Richard Metlen. Magazine RCModeler Nov.1978 The trouble was that nobody believed in an un-armed bomber, far less a wooden one. By sheer relentless effort, Sir Geoffrey De Havilland and C.C.Walker managed to get specification B.1/40 written in January 1940, and, after the DH 98 had twice been cancelled in the panic of that summer, the yellow prototype flew at Hatfield on 25th November 1940 The de Havilland DH.98 Mosquito is a British twin-engine shoulder-winged multi-role combat aircraft, introduced during the Second World War, unusual in that its frame was constructed almost entirely of wood.It was nicknamed The Wooden Wonder, or Mossie to its crews. Lord Beaverbrook, Minister of Aircraft Production, nicknamed it Freeman's Folly, alluding to Air Chief Marshal Sir Wilfred. The de Havilland Mosquito Because of its mostly wooden construction, the British de Havilland Mosquito was an aircraft that served in a variety of roles. Built between 1940 and 1950, the Wooden Wonder was one of the fastest planes in the world - in fact, thanks to the wooden construction, it flew 20 mph faster than the famous Spitfire. A private venture aircraft, the much-loved De Havilland Mosquito was perhaps the most versatile of all British aircraft of the 2nd World War. Revolutionary in its wood construction, the de Havilland Mosquito played a vital role in the war combining the maneuverability of a fighter with the payload of a medium bomber